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Farage admits offshore tax fund was a mistake: “I’m not rich enough”

daily alternative | alternative news - Farage admits offshore tax fund was a mistake: "I'm not rich enough"

Has Nigel Farage’s seemingly inexorable rise finally come to an end? It feels that way this morning. The UKIP leader is on the defensive after the Daily Mirror revealed that he opened an offshore trust fund on the Isle of Man “for inheritance purposes”, while in last night’s Scottish by-election in Aberdeen Donside his party finished a disappointing fifth and lost its deposit after winning only 4.8 per cent of the vote.

Farage wisely responded to the tax story by immediately admitting that it was “a mistake”, although his declaration that he’s “not rich enough to need one” is unlikely elicit much sympathy from voters. He said: “My financial advisers recommended I did it, to have a trust really for inheritance purposes and I took the advice and I set it up.

“It was a mistake. I was a completely unsuitable person for it. I am not blaming them, it was my fault.

“It’s a vehicle that you chuck things in through your life that you don’t need and you build up a trust fund for your children or grandchildren.

“It was called an educational trust and could have been used for grandchildren’s schools fees, things like that.

“It was a mistake for three reasons. Firstly, I’m not rich enough to need one and I am never going to be.

“Secondly, frankly, the world has changed. Things that we thought were absolutely fair practice 10 years, 20 years ago, 30 years ago aren’t any more.

“Thirdly, it was a mistake because it cost me money. I sent a cheque off to set it up.”

The story is all the more damaging for Farage because he also stands accused of hypocrisy. In a speech last month in the European Parliament, he told MEPs that they had a “common enemy – rich people, successful companies evading tax”. Farage, of course, is guilty of legal tax avoidance, not illegal tax evasion, but it’s the shared motive that counts.

As for the by-election, while UKIP’s share of 4.8 per cent might be considered impressive given that it had no previous presence in the seat, its prediction that it would keep its deposit (by polling at least 5 per cent) means it must be regarded as a failure. Lord Monckton, the party’s Scottish leader, declared before the result: “We have made a breakthrough. It’s clear now we’ll keep our deposit”.

Alex Salmond (interviewed in this week’s NS) said: “They have never saved a single deposit in Scotland, which once again demonstrates a clear divergence between Scottish and Westminster politics.”

 

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Law & Politics

Police Will Be Able To Read Everyone’s Internet Search History Under New Plan

UK Police are asking the government for new surveillance powers to be able to view the Internet search history of every single person in the country.

Richard Berry, the National Police Chiefs’ Council spokesman told The Guardian that “We want to police by consent, and we want to ensure that privacy safeguards are in place. But we need to balance this with the needs of the vulnerable and the victims. We essentially need the ‘who, where, when and what’ of any communication – who initiated it, where were they and when did it happened. And a little bit of the ‘what’, were they on Facebook, or a banking site, or an illegal child-abuse image-sharing website?”

“Five years ago, [a suspect] could have physically walked into a bank and carried out a transaction. We could have put a surveillance team on that but now, most of it is done online. We just want to know about the visit,” he added.

It is likely that police are already looking at your online activity, but just want the power to do it legally. As we learned from whistleblower Edward Snowden, governments are very interested what their citizens are doing online, and they do have the technology to spy on every telephone call and Internet communication.

Police in the UK have been attempting to reach for these powers through legislation for years, but they have been blocked on multiple occasions. This new effort proves that they will not be giving up on getting legal permission for their spying programs.

MP David Davis told The Guardian “It’s extraordinary they’re asking for this again, they are overreaching and there is no proven need to retain such data for a year.”

Home Secretary Theresa May will announce the specifics of the plan during a meeting about the Government’s new surveillance bill in the House of Commons on Wednesday.

“I’ve said many times before that it is not possible to debate the balance between privacy and security, including the rights and wrongs of intrusive powers and the oversight arrangements that govern them without also considering the threats that we face as a country,” May said.

“They include not just terrorism from overseas and home-grown in the UK, but also industrial, military and state espionage.They include not just organized criminality, but also the proliferation of once physical crimes online, such as child sexual exploitation. And the technological challenges that that brings. In the face of such threats we have a duty to ensure that the agencies whose job it is to keep us safe have the powers they need to do the job,” she added.

 

daily alternative | alternative news -Police Will Be Able To Read Everyone’s Internet Search History Under New Plan

via Police Will Be Able To Read Everyone’s Internet Search History Under New Plan.

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