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June 6-9: Bilderberg Meeting behind Closed Doors – On the Agenda

daily alternative | alternative news - June 6-9: Bilderberg Meeting behind Closed Doors - On the Agenda

Its four-day meeting occurs annually. It’s a rite of spring. British political economist Will Hutton calls the group the “high priests of globalization.”

Powerful movers and shakers have their own agenda.They discuss key issues.

They do it year round. Once annually they meet face-to-face. They plot strategy to exploit the world’s riches. They want them for themselves.

They try to keep meeting dates, locations, and issues to be discussed secret.

Word gets out. It’s official. Britain’s five-star Grove Hotel is this year’s venue. It’s a Hertfordshire, England hotel resort. It calls itself “London’s cosmopolitan country estate.”

It’s 18 miles from London. It’s 30 minutes from Heathrow Airport. It’s ideal for secluded meetings. Great pains are taken to keep journalists, activists, and other uninvited guests away.

On May 13, Infowars reporters Paul Joseph Watson and Jon Scobie visited the Grove Hotel. They claim to have “groundbraking” information.

Google’s CEO Eric Schmidt is a regular Bilderberg attendee. Watson and Scobie said his company is “merging” with Bilderberg.

“Google’s annual Zeitgeist conference, which has been based at the Grove since 2007, immediately precedes the Bilderberg Group conference by a matter of days.”

“Backed up by prior research, we were able to confirm in conversations with hotel managers and others that the Grove is now a central base for Google’s agenda to control the global political and technological landscape.”

Bilderberg’s “being recast as ‘Google-Berg’ – partly because of efforts on behalf of activists to tear away the veil of Bilderberg’s much cherished secrecy, and partly as a means of re-branding authoritarian, undemocratic secret gatherings of elites as trendy, liberal, feel-good philanthropic-style forums like Google Zeitgeist and TED.”

In May 2012, London’s Telegraph headlined “Google invites the best and brightest into its Big Tent.”

It’s Google’s annual Zeitgeist conference. The Telegraph compared it to annual Davos World Economic Forum meetings. Major global figures participate in both.

Eric Schmidt thinks “privacy is a relic of the past,” said Infowars. He “plans to turn Google into the ultimate Big Brother.”

He and Bilderberg members share a common agenda. In part, it reflects a “collectivist, permanently networked world (without) individuality and privacy.”

Bilderberg’s grand design is one-world government comprised of rulers and serfs. It wants total unchallenged global control.

Infowars said its “inside source” listed the following June issues for discussion:

  • destroying Iran’s nuclear facilities within three years;
  • prolonging war on Syria by arming anti-Assad elements;
  • the threat of a global pandemic;
  • controlling 3D printing;
  • Internet control through “cyber resilience;”
  • establishing a ministry of truth; Orwell explained its mission and more, saying:

“The Ministry of Peace concerns itself with war, the Ministry of Truth with lies, the Ministry of Love with torture and the Ministry of Plenty with starvation.”

“These contradictions are not accidental, nor do they result from from ordinary hypocrisy: they are deliberate exercises in doublethink.”

Other Bilderberg topics include:

  • smart cities for mass surveillance;
  • diffusing austerity induced social protests;
  • preventing Britain from leaving the EU;
  • propping up the euro to keep the Eurozone intact;
  • minimal 2013 economic growth;
  • increasing central bank power;
  • transferring more wealth from ordinary people to corporations and super-rich elites; and
  • preventing a growing credit bubble from popping.

In 2007, Privacy International’s “Race to the Bottom” report addressed privacy rankings of Internet service companies. A previous article discussed its comments on Google, saying:

“….throughout our research we have found numerous deficiencies and hostilities in Google’s approach to privacy that go well beyond those of other organizations.”

It’s “an endemic threat to privacy. This is in part due to the diversity and specificity of Google’s product range and the ability of the company to share extracted data between these tools, and in part due to Google’s market dominance and the sheer size of its user base.”

“Its aggressive use of invasive or potentially invasive technologies and techniques” is unmatched.

It’s able to “deep drill into the minutiae of a user’s life and lifestyle choices.” It has no qualms about doing it irresponsibly.

It retains volumes user information. No limitations are placed on its subsequent use or disclosure. Users aren’t able to delete or withdraw it.

It retains all “search strings and associated IP-addresses and time stamps for at least 18 to 24 months, and does not provide users with an expungement option.”

It has other personal information on hobbies, employment, addresses, phone numbers, and more. It retains it after users delete their profiles.

It “collects all search results entered through Google Toolbar, and identifies all Google Toolbar users with a unique cookie that allows Google to track the user’s web movements.”

Information is retained indefinitely. It provides a permanent record. Doing so spurns OECD Privacy Guidelines and EU data protection law provisions.

Users can’t edit or delete records and information. They can’t access log information generated through various Google services, such as Google Maps, Video, Talk, Reader, or Blogger.

In 2004, Google also acquired the CIA-linked company Keyhole, Inc. It maintains a worldwide 3-D spy-in-the-sky images database.

Its software provides a virtual fly-over and zoom-in capability. It does so within a one-foot resolution.

It’s supported by In-Q-Tel. It’s a venture capital CIA-funded firm. It “identif(ies) and invest(s) in companies developing cutting-edge information technologies that serve United States national security interests.”

In 2003, its CEO, John Hanke, said:

“Keyhole’s strategic relationship with In-Q-Tel means that the Intelligence Community can now benefit from the massive scalability and high performance of the Keyhole enterprise solution.”

In 2006, former CIA clandestine services case officer, Robert Steele, said:

“I am quite positive that Google is taking money and direction from my old colleague Dr. Rick Steinheiser in the Office of Research and Development at CIA, and that Google has done at least one major prototype effort focused on foreign terrorists which produced largely worthless data.”

“I think (Google is) stupid to be playing with CIA, which cannot keep a secret and is more likely to waste time and money than actually produce anything useful.”

On April 29, 2009, Willem Buiter’s Financial Times article headlined “Gagging on Google,” saying:

“Google is to privacy and respect for intellectual property rights what the Taliban are to women’s rights and civil liberties: a daunting threat that must be fought relentlessly by all those who value privacy and the right to exercise, within the limits of the law, control over the uses made by others of their intellectual property.”

It should be strictly regulated, “and if necessary, broken up or put out of business.” It “lays the foundations for corporate or even official Big Brotherism.”

Google Street View’s addition to Google Maps, “provides panoram(ic) images visible from street level in cities around the world.”

“The cameras record details of residents’ lives.” They do so without permission. Personal privacy is violated.

It’s also done through tracking cookies or “third-party persistent cookies.” They assist interest-based advertising. It’s known as behavioral targeting.

In the wrong hands, information can be used “to put a commercial squeeze on people, but also to extort and blackmail them.”

In government hands, it enhances “a pretty effective and very nasty police state.”

Can Google be trusted to use this information responsibly? “Of course not.” It’s a business run by “amoral capitalists.” It seeks profits by any means.

Google and other Internet search engines “should not be trusted because they cannot be trusted.” Because of its size and dominance, Google’s “the new evil empire of the internet.” It’s a menacing “Leviathan.”

If true, partnering (merging) with Bilderberg enhances the threat. Institutionalized spying endangers everyone. Today’s technology exceeds the worst of what Orwell imagined.

Big Brother isn’t fiction. It’s watching everyone all the time for any reason. It does so with sweeping technological effectiveness. It makes Bilderberg’s ideal world more possible.

 

daily alternative | alternative news – June 6-9: Bilderberg Meeting behind Closed Doors – On the Agenda

via June 6-9: Bilderberg Meeting behind Closed Doors. On the Agenda: Domestic Spying, Diffusing Social Protests, War on Syria and Iran

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Britain’s House Price Crash – 2016 Predictions Mount

Housing in many countries, especially Britain, is no longer an investment; it’s now made up of three fundamentals: consumption, crime and concern. The general public getting on the bandwagon with cheap loans is consumption. The crime slot is taken now that over 40% of Britain’s housing stock is bought in cash with property used as an international laundrette to wash hundreds of billions and concern comes from savers who quite rightly think that the banks and government will steal their hard-earned (low or negative savings rates), tax-paid money that drives a reluctant middle class into becoming landlords.

Cheap loans will prevail but credit is drying up the world over. The criminals have stopped buying in over-heated Britain and even George Osborne, who has fueled the bubble, is taking action against amateur landlords that make up the vast majority of property investors in Britain.

But don’t take my word for it. Predictions of a house price crash in 2016 are now mounting thick and fast, something unheard of in previous property recessions and particularly back in 2007 just before the last epic fall.

We kick off with consumption. The Week has a piece from Pete Redfern, the chief executive of Taylor Wimpey, Britain’s biggest house builder who says that “The UK is in a “borderline place” on home ownership as a result of rampant price rises and more needs to be done to rein in the pace of (property) inflation”. It also makes the observation that “London, where the housing market is becoming so detached from the wider UK that it has been called “another country”.

Then we have dodgy dosh from overseas; as RT reports – “Asian and Russian luxury homebuyers are deserting London’s property market amid economic uncertainty. Property buyers from Asia made up 26 percent of those buying homes in wealthy areas of London such as Kensington, Chelsea, and Belgravia in the first three quarters of last year. That figure has dropped to 6 percent according to figures compiled by estate agent Hamptons for the Financial Times”.

And not forgetting those poor fearful middle class reluctant landlords about to lose their shirts. From industry expert Letting Agent Today – “Osborne has slashed rental sector confidence ‘to below crisis levels’. Landlords’ confidence in the buy to let sector has collapsed to an all-time low and is now “worse than levels witnessed during the financial crash” according to a trade body. Richard Lambert, chief executive of the National Landlords Association, says confidence in landlords’ business expectations has tumbled by more than a third over the past year – down from 67 per cent to an all-time low of 43 per cent. The current level of confidence in the BTL sector is now five per cent lower than levels witnessed after the financial crash in 2007”.

The property bubble will burst and London will be its epicenter. But it’s not just London that is causing it. Back in the early 1990s I was already a few years into my 25-year career in residential property. Chancellor Nigel Lawson decided to abolish MIRAS in 1988 – a mortgage relief scheme which saved homeowners thousands on their payments. Stupidly, Lawson gave about six months notice. This pushed up prices as buyers rushed to snatch up a property before the tax break disappeared, much the same as Osborne’s increase in tax and subsequent epic run by property investors to beat the deadline this April.

On that day in April 1988 I saw the entire property industry implode. Property prices fell by around a third, 1.5 million homeowners declined into negative equity, annual repossessions doubled, tripled and then quadrupled in a matter of months. At one point repossessions represented 1 in every 130 households of Britain.

A few years later I switched from selling property to renting and ended up managing one of the biggest residential rental portfolios in the UK. I had 11,000 repossessions to manage because the government had offered tax breaks to banks and building societies to stop these units reaching the market via auctions (called Business Expansion Scheme Companies or BESCo’s) and utterly destroying what little remained of the housing market. I also had another 2,000 high-end units where building companies had gone bust with no one to buy them. We filled them with all those that had lost their homes or where the government were paying housing benefit – obviously.

Over 40% of Thatcher’s right-to-buy disaster ended up being repossessed. Cameron has just made the same mistake, except he’s a bit late in the game announcing it this time around.

Like last time, the bubble will burst where the price is most inflated – London. Unlike previous deflations, this one is predicted, and the writing is large and loud.

 

daily alternative | alternative news – Britain’s House Price Crash – 2016 Predictions Mount

via Britain’s House Price Crash – 2016 Predictions Mount.

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