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Last-ditch resistance to NHS reform crumbles

dailyalternative | alternative news - Last-ditch resistance to NHS reform crumbles

A last-ditch effort to stop the government’s NHS reform programme fell apart in the Lords last night, with Tory and Lib Dem peers forcing through wide-ranging changes to the health service.

Opponents lost by 254 votes to 146 in a bid to prevent rules coming into force which would force services to be tendered out to private firms rather than just NHS providers.

“Don’t think this is a minor step. If this goes through the National Health Service as we have seen it, as we have believed in it, as we have persuaded the electorate that we support it, will be massively changed,” Labour’s Lord Owen said.

“It will take five, ten, 15, maybe 20 years, but unless we pull back from this whole attitude there will be no National Health Service that any of us can recognise.

“I for one feel tonight one feeling only: overwhelming sadness.”

One hundred and fourteen Labour peers were joined by 23 crossbenchers, six others and the bishops of Bath, Wells and Bristol in trying to vote down the Section 75 legislation.

They were defeated by 173 Tories, 63 Liberal Democrats and 15 crossbenchers, as well as the bishop of Exeter, Ulster Unionist Lord Empey and Labour’s former health minister Lord Warner.

Over 300,000 people have signed a petition opposing the move.

Government ministers say the changes are merely a continuation of market reforms conducted by Labour when it was in power.

But voluntary groups say they will be forced out of the market by well-financed bidding operations by medical corporations and medical experts have warned of atomised services.

Phil Gray, chief executive of the Chartered Society of Physiotherapy, said: “The government’s claim that effective services will be protected from competition is undermined by recent history.

“We have already seen excellent services opened up to the market for no good reason with the expansion of any qualified provider for community health services such as physiotherapy.

“This has led to restrictions on treatment for patients and confusion for commissioners.”

He added: “These new regulations seem certain to do the same for all other NHS services in an open market.”

 

See also 1 Mans Crawl for Everyone’s Cause

 

dailyalternative | alternative news – Last-ditch resistance to NHS reform crumbles

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Health & Science

Google Now Has Access To Millions of Patients’ Medical Records

A controversial deal between tech giant Google and the National Health Service (NHS) will allow artificial intelligence units access to 1.6 million confidential medical records. Since 2014, Google has partnered with several scientists in an attempt to understand human health, but a new report reveals the data gathering goes far beyond what was originally anticipated.

According to documents obtained by the New Scientist, the data sharing agreement between Google-owned artificial intelligence company DeepMind and the Royal Free NHS Trust gives access to the sensitive healthcare data of millions of NHS patients. The chilling and wide-reaching deal allows DeepMind access to the medical records of the 1.6 million people passing annually through the three London hospitals owned by the Trust — Barnet, Chase Farm, and the Royal Free.

The Google-owned A.I. firm announced in February it was working with the NHS to build an app called Streams — intended to help hospitals monitor patients with kidney disease. However, the new information has revealed that the extent of the data being shared goes much further and includes logs of day-to-day hospital activity, records of the location and status of patients, and even logs of who visits them and when.

Results of pathology and radiology tests are also shared, as is information from critical care and accident and emergency departments. In addition, DeepMind’s access to the centralised records of all NHS hospital treatments in the U.K. means the tech company can access historical data from the last five years, all while receiving a continuous stream of new data.

At the same time, DeepMind is developing a platform called Patient Rescue, which uses hospital data streams to build tools to carry out analysis and support diagnostic decisions. The New Scientist explained how it works:

Comparing a new patient’s information with millions of other cases, Patient Rescue might be able to predict that they are in the early stages of a disease that has not yet become symptomatic, for example. Doctors could then run tests to see if the prediction is correct.

While the Royal Free has not yet responded to the question of what — if any — opt-out mechanisms are available to patients, the New Scientist suggests this is unlikely to be a straightforward process. Despite the agreement stating Google cannot use the data in any other part of the company’s business, many will be seriously wary of the access the online tech giant now has to the confidential data of millions of people.

As the New Scientist wrote:

Data mining is the name of the game in the burgeoning field of machine learning and artificial intelligence, and there’s no company in the world better at that than Google.

 

daily alternative | alternative news – Google Now Has Access To Millions of Patients’ Medical Records

via Google Now Has Access To Millions of Patients’ Medical Records.

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